Chronological Tour: Stop 280

D’oh!



Home-plate entrance to Isotopes Park, Aug-2004.

The seating bowl, as seen from the berm in right field.

A mound in straightaway center field breaks up the fence line.

Quick Facts: Rating: 4 baseballs
When the Calgary Cannons moved to Albuquerque for the 2003 season, fans chose the name “Isotopes” over the traditional “Dukes” in deference to an episode of The Simpsons where Homer’s beloved Springfield Isotopes threaten to move to Albuquerque.

They built a brand-new stadium on the site of the old Albuquerque Sports Stadium, where the Dukes had played for 32 seasons in a park that was showing its age. They kept the playing field in the same place and started over with the facility, which now features a walk-around outfield, with an expansive right-field berm replacing the old “drive-in” area. There is also half an upper deck, on the left-field side helping screen out the setting sun for the players.

To me, though, the park has one fatal flaw. While it is 428 feet to very near center field, the stadium builders put a large semicircular mound in dead center field, shortening the straightaway distance to 400 feet and also creating a hazard for a center fielder attempting to make a play. I’m honestly surprised there haven’t been broken ankles approaching that spot.

Oh, and the big baseball on the corner of University Avenue and Avenida Cesar Chavez has been retained. The park is one of three athletic facilities on the corner, the other two being University Stadium and University Arena (“The Pit”), which host football and basketball for the University of New Mexico.


Game # Date League Level Result
693 Tue 10-Aug-2004 Pacific Coast AAA ALBUQUERQUE 1, Fresno 0, 1st
694 Tue 10-Aug-2004 Pacific Coast AAA ALBUQUERQUE 6, Fresno 0, 2d
1019 Mon 24-Aug-2009 Pacific Coast AAA Nashville 11, ALBUQUERQUE 5
1319 Thu 24-Jul-2014 Pacific Coast AAA ALBUQUERQUE 8, Fresno 7
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This page updated 24-Jul-2014